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Bloggerhouse presents: The Return of The Shelved Album (Pudgee-King Of New York)

by Eric on August 20, 2010

“The King Of New York”-Pudgee

Slated Release Date:  (1996, Perspective Records)

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Pudgee  was a highly underrated cat, point blank he just a double dose of a “raw deal”.  As the “Phat Bastard”, Pudgee dropped a solid LP in ’93 with “Give ‘Em The Finger”.  The album, with production from the TrackMasters and Tony Dofat, did fairly well and actually earned a decent review in the pages of The Source (3.5 Mics).  Yet, Pudgee was caught in the middle of the Giant/Warner Bros. fiasco and poor promotion led to even slimmer albums sales.   Pudgee was probably more “in demand” for his ghost-writing talents, as he penned for the likes of Antoinette and several other big-time (word is, “female”) artists.  Not to put a dimmer on Pudgee’s lyrical and writing talents, but you’ve gotta’ peep Joe Fatal’s (“Live At The BBQ”) take on Pudgee in an interview over at unkut.com.  There’s some pretty interesting statements made on Fatal’s behalf in that sit-down.

Similar to label-mate Young Zee, in ’96/’97 Pudgee was set to drop a follow-up to “Give ‘Em The Finger”, titled “King Of New York” (originally titled “Niguz Fa Life”)  on the Perspective imprint (which, thanks to Dart, I just found out was owned and operated by Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis)  but when Perspective Records dissolved, apparently due to Lewis & Jam’s mismanagement,  the album found itself placed back upon the shelf.  One of the intended cuts for “King Of New York”, the Notorious B.I.G. and Lord Tariq-featured, mixtape mainstay, ‘Think Big’ is often deemed a classic by underground heads.   The album also included many features such as D-Nice, DMX, M.O.P., Royal Flush, Digable Planets (“Everyone Wants To Be Hard”) and production from the likes of Nick Wiz and EZ Elpee.  So it’s safe to say that the album featured more heat than just Pudgee’s most notable hit to date, “Think Big”.

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{ 4 comments }

Pooch August 20, 2010 at 10:08 am

I don’t know how I have missed this over the years. Upon first listen, all I can say is that this represents the sound of East Coast / New York of ’94, which made it immediately take a place in my heart. The production is nice, and it is always easy to give an older project a listen when it comes from a punchline oriented rapper (you get drawn in and pay attention). Pudgee was good with the chorus and the use of the adlibs. This will get some play this week. Thanks Eric. You impressed me by coming with something that was off my radar, album-wise.

Joe Fatal definitely had an issue with Pudgee, don’t know what happened between them.

Pooch

jrrider August 20, 2010 at 3:32 pm

Damn Vitamin D stole that one too. (Looks for White Van Music CD)

M Pire August 20, 2010 at 4:37 pm

I didn’t even know this album was out there. I always enjoy listening to unreleased stuff from the 90′s. I always wondered why Pudgee that one song with Biggie and nothing else around that time. I guess this answers that question.

Pesko August 22, 2010 at 3:48 pm

f/ Lord Tariq

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